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Poster: B. Stockwell Date: Jan 6, 2010 7:18pm
Forum: classic_tv Subject: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

You know that retro soundtrack feeling you get from 50s and early 60s television and industrial films? Well, I needed that "My Little Margie" ambiance, that music you'd hear when the scene changed from the checkerboard breakfast table to Dad sitting at his desk. Brace yourselves: The Archive has at least three collections of the stuff. Check out "Loose-Seely" for, quote,"1950s stock music used on TV. Composed by B. Loose and J. Seely."

http://www.archive.org/details/Loose-Seely
http://www.archive.org/details/Loose-Seely

Tracks four and five in that second set are of extreme interest: those tracks, pepped up, became the theme to "The Donna Reed Show." Amazing. Golly.

One other IA page for B. Loose, whose first name turns out to be Bill:

http://www.archive.org/details/BillLoose

I've reviewed these 5-star mother lodes as follows:

"I needed generic industrial film music - free, of course - and here it is! All the cozy and mood-enhancing background music to use in YOUR faux-1950s industrial film parody. Or as snotty cartoon music pastiches echoing the early Hanna-Barbera era. It's so earnestly retro it hurts. A lot. There are two collections of music like this in The Archive, both composed by "B. Loose and J. Seely." When Robert Young or Donna Reed came home for warm family antics, this is what they heard. When the president of a no-name factory needed music to accompany the activities of his happy workers, THIS was the music. Me? I'll use it for a fake documentary about the coffee shop I work at. Real day-in-the-life stuff. It has to be heard. This is The Real Deal, kids. Wow!"

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Poster: dennisfromhillsdale Date: Oct 3, 2013 4:09am
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

RE: http://archive.org/post/284804/a-treasure-chest-of-sitcom-gold

I don't hear "The Donna Reed Show" theme (also known as "Happy Day") in the fourth or fifth track in the set of tracks from that second link. Please explain more fully.

Supposedly the Screen Gems television series' used lots of music cues from the Theme Craft (the "TC" series of cues)division of Capitol Records' Hi-Q library.

I also read on another website that Screen Gems music supervisor Irving Friedman directed "The Donna Reed Show" theme only be used in broadcast TV by that series, although the cue was allowed to continue being used in industrial films.

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Poster: B. Stockwell Date: Oct 3, 2013 6:33am
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

Sorry for the confusion. Somehow, there's a misdirection going on here - possibly because there are multiple uploads of this material with different catalog numbers. You'll find the Donna Reed piece - I hope! - listed as Tracks 4 and 5, "4-TC-430 Domestic" and "5-TC-430A Domestic", on this page:

http://archive.org/details/Seely-Loose

Thank you for noticing this error.

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Poster: Meatpies Date: Jan 7, 2010 7:14am
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

I don't know who you are, but I love you!!!

I have been needing stuff like this for videos I'm working on!

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Poster: B. Stockwell Date: Jan 7, 2010 5:48pm
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

There were dozens and dozen of records in the Hi-Q catalog. The various LPS, 45s, and reel-to-reel tapes were produced by Capitol Records. Not available on CD - yet! About 75 records were released and, Golly Gosh, has that music with stood the Test-o-Time! There is an amazingly info-crammed thread about the Hi-Q series at Soundtrack Collectors:

http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/forum/displayquestion.php?topicid=7027

Someone bought 57 of the LPs on eBay for $100.00. (Most of the cost was for shipping them - to Sweden!)

And yes, Hi-Q is supposed to remind you of I.Q. and, yep, is short for High Quality.

Even now, there are six of these LPs and almost three DOZEN reel-t-reel tapes on eBay. I'm going to try to get the six LPs; tomorrow's pay day, after all. IF I get them - IF! - they'll be digitally transferred to The Achive and you'll be the first to know, gang.

Wish me luck 'cause when I win, we ALL win!

More basic info: Hi-Q was a brand and library of production music produced and distributed by Capitol Records in the late 1950s-early 1960s. It saw quite a bit of use in several movies and other productions, most notably in the 1968 film Night of the Living Dead, in which producer Karl Hardman used tracks from the library and then enhanced them by adding electronic effects (such as echo and reverb).

The Ren and Stimpy Show, Amazon Women on the Moon, Gumby and countless other productions have also used cues from the Hi-Q library.

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Poster: cosmico Date: Jan 6, 2010 8:02pm
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

Thanks! Now if only we could find some cool, free music from the old b-movies and drama shows of the fifties, too!

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Poster: B. Stockwell Date: Jan 6, 2010 8:27pm
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

Here's a start:

http://www.archive.org/details/Hi-qMiscellany

The "Chase" cues are especially piquant, today. I recommend the Chase Medium.

The problem with B movie music is that most films commissioned original scores - even the cheap ones. As such, those scores are still owned by someone, usually the studios; they'd re-use music to save time/money. It was a great training ground for future "real" composers. Henry Mancini was one of the anonymous composers who wrote music for "The Creature from the Black Lagoon" films as well as the Francis the Talking Mule series. Oh, and the Bonzo films - music for monkeys.

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Poster: quigs Date: Jan 10, 2010 12:41pm
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

The Medium chase are okay, but one I love is Agitato-oh yeah!!!!!!!!!! I remember a show on Desilu called The Texan. I don' remember the show that well but when the end credits THAT CAME ON!!!!!!!!!!!! I still remember (or the variation of it) If you find it, please put it up.

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Poster: cosmico Date: Jan 6, 2010 8:44pm
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

Thanks for the link! I definitely recognize some of those tracks!

I know what you mean about low-budget films that could still afford original scores, thanks to people like Albert Glasser, Leith Stevens, Ronald Stein, Sawtell and Shefter, and many others. I was thinking too of b- or z-films that used library music, such as PLAN 9 and others. And didn't TEENAGERS FROM OUTER SPACE and NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD use the Hi-Q library?

Thanks again!

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Poster: quigs Date: Jan 7, 2010 6:51am
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

also the music for Have Gun Will Travel is done by Bernard Hermann (title music). He was only given credit for the pilot show Three Bells to Perdido but the remainin programs he was not.

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Poster: dennisfromhillsdale Date: Oct 3, 2013 4:00am
Forum: classic_tv Subject: Re: A Treasure Chest of Sitcom Gold!

RE: http://archive.org/post/284804/a-treasure-chest-of-sitcom-gold

I don't hear "The Donna Reed Show" theme (also known as "Happy Day") in the fourth or fifth track in the set of tracks from that second link. Please explain more fully.

Supposedly the Screen Gems television series' used lots of music cues from the Theme Craft (the "TC" series of cues)division of Capitol Records' Hi-Q library.

I also read on another website that Screen Gems music supervisor Irving Friedman directed "The Donna Reed Show" theme only be used in broadcast TV by that series, although the cue was allowed to continue being used in industrial films.